Moscow at NightMoscow appears at the center of this nighttime image photographed by the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station, flying at an altitude of approximately 240 miles on March 28, 2012. A solar array panel for the space station is on the left side of the frame. The view is to the north-northwest from a nadir of approximately 49.4 degrees north latitude and 42.1 degrees east longitude, about 100 miles west-northwest of Volgograd. The Aurora Borealis, airglow and daybreak frame the horizon.Image Credit: NASA

Moscow at Night

Moscow appears at the center of this nighttime image photographed by the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station, flying at an altitude of approximately 240 miles on March 28, 2012. A solar array panel for the space station is on the left side of the frame. The view is to the north-northwest from a nadir of approximately 49.4 degrees north latitude and 42.1 degrees east longitude, about 100 miles west-northwest of Volgograd. The Aurora Borealis, airglow and daybreak frame the horizon.

Image Credit: NASA

the-star-stuff:

Complete time-lapse video of the Sun, spanning the entire months of September, October and November 2011 as seen through the SWAP ultraviolet instrument onboard the European Space Agency spacecraft Proba-2.

the-star-stuff:

Complete time-lapse video of the Sun, spanning the entire months of September, October and November 2011 as seen through the SWAP ultraviolet instrument onboard the European Space Agency spacecraft Proba-2.

Tags: physics

Hubble Spies a Spiral Galaxy Edge-on
Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Spies a Spiral Galaxy Edge-on

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

LHC hall

LHC hall

Over the next three and a half years, Project NEOShield (Near Earth Object Shield)will investigate how to prevent impacts by asteroids and comets. Asteroids typically approach Earth at speeds of between five and 30 kilometres per second. Thousands of near-Earth objects (NEOs) have been discovered in the past 20 years

Photograph: JPL-Caltech/NASA

Over the next three and a half years, Project NEOShield (Near Earth Object Shield)will investigate how to prevent impacts by asteroids and comets. Asteroids typically approach Earth at speeds of between five and 30 kilometres per second. Thousands of near-Earth objects (NEOs) have been discovered in the past 20 years

Photograph: JPL-Caltech/NASA

Perspective view of ancient volcanic plains in the northern high-latitudes of Mercury revealed by instruments on board the MESSENGER spacecraft.
Image: NASA/JHUAPL/CIW-DTM/GSFC/MIT/Brown Univ/; Rendering by James Dickson

Perspective view of ancient volcanic plains in the northern high-latitudes of Mercury revealed by instruments on board the MESSENGER spacecraft.

Image: NASA/JHUAPL/CIW-DTM/GSFC/MIT/Brown Univ/; Rendering by James Dickson

tibor-1:

Cat’s Eye nebula.

tibor-1:

Cat’s Eye nebula.

This image, taken on March 6, 1969, shows the Apollo 9 Command and Service Modules docked with the Lunar Module. Apollo 9 astronaut Dave Scott stands in the open hatch of the Command Module, nicknamed “Gumdrop,” docked to the Lunar Module “Spider” in Earth orbit. His crewmate Rusty Schweickart, lunar module pilot, took this photograph from the porch of the lunar module. Inside the lunar module was Apollo 9 commander Jim McDivitt. The crew tested the orbital rendezvous and docking procedures that made the lunar landings possible.Image Credit: NASA

This image, taken on March 6, 1969, shows the Apollo 9 Command and Service Modules docked with the Lunar Module. Apollo 9 astronaut Dave Scott stands in the open hatch of the Command Module, nicknamed “Gumdrop,” docked to the Lunar Module “Spider” in Earth orbit. His crewmate Rusty Schweickart, lunar module pilot, took this photograph from the porch of the lunar module. Inside the lunar module was Apollo 9 commander Jim McDivitt. The crew tested the orbital rendezvous and docking procedures that made the lunar landings possible.


Image Credit: NASA

Tags: NASA physics

Researchers at the Vienna University of Technology have developed a nano 3D printer that can create complex objects that are no bigger than a grain of sand. Here is St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna.

Researchers at the Vienna University of Technology have developed a nano 3D printer that can create complex objects that are no bigger than a grain of sand. Here is St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna.

Solar Flares

Solar Flares